HVAC Equipment in the U.S.

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Published Feb 1, 2007 | 262 Pages | Pub ID: SB1281486

HVAC Equipment in the U.S., new from SBI, contains comprehensive data on the U.S. market for heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), including shipments, imports and exports, end-use markets, and industry statistics. It also identifies key trends affecting the marketplace and profiles major marketers, along with their strategies used to maximize growth and profitability. The market does not include: air conditioning condensing units, refrigerants, and refrigeration equipment.

The market is classified into the following five categories:

    1. Heat transfer equipment
    • Packaged Terminal Air Conditioners
    • Packaged Terminal Heat Pumps
    • Evaporative Condensers
    • Room Fan Coil Air conditioners units
    • Motor-driven Station Air Handler

    2. Room air conditioners and dehumidifiers
    • Room air conditioners
    • Electrically Operated Dehumidifiers, Mechanically Refrigerated, Self-Contained

    3. Unitary Air conditioners
    • Single Package Air Conditioners, with or without Evaporator Fans, including
    • Refrigeration Chassis and Remote-Condenser type
    • Year-round Air Conditioners, Single Package, and Remote-Condenser Type (except Heat Pumps)
    • Water source Heat Pumps (except Room Air Conditioners)
    • Split System Air-Conditioning Condensing Units
    • Split System Air-Conditioning Coils
    • Air Source Heat Pumps (except Room Air Conditioners)

    4. Non-Electric Warm Air Furnaces and Humidifiers
    • Oil, Forced Air Furnaces
    • Gas, Forced Air Furnaces
    • All Other Non-Electric Warm Air Furnaces.
    • Humidifiers (attachments to warm air furnaces) (all types), including Central Systems and Self-Contained (except Portable Humidifiers)

    5. Ground and Ground Water Source Heat Pumps

Scope and Methodology
This report data was obtained from government sources, trade associations, publications, business journals, company literature, and investment reports.

Shipment statistics are derived from the U.S. Census of Manufacturers and the Annual Survey of Manufacturers, and is estimated and forecasted by SBI. Import and export data by major country of origin is derived from the U.S. Department of Commerce and the U.S. International Trade Commission. Historical data are provided for 2001 through 2005, with forecast data from 2006 to 2010.

The market size of HVAC equipment is defined as the amount of HVAC equipment supplied to the total U.S. marketplace, in a particular period. Therefore, market size is determined by supply rather than demand. The U.S. HVAC market supply was calculated from the Department of Commerce statistics by collecting data from domestic plant shipments, adding imports, and extracting exports. As such, the formula for determining the market size will be Production in the U.S. + Balance of Trade [i.e. Shipments + (Imports - Exports)].

Also, note that the values are in net selling values, i.e., free on board (f.o.b.) from the manufacturing plant, and not the retail/wholesale price sold to the end consumer.

What You’ll Get in this Report
HVAC Equipment in the U.S. makes important predictions and recommendations regarding the future of this market, and pinpoints ways current and prospective marketers can capitalize on current trends and spearhead new ones. No other market research report provides both the comprehensive analysis and extensive data that HVAC Equipment in the U.S. offers. The report addresses the following segments:

  • The Market (including market size and composition, and projected market growth)
  • Competitive Profiles (of the mainstream marketers, specialists and up-and-coming niche players, and analyses of the products they market)
  • Market Dynamics
  • End-Users
  • The Products

Plus, you’ll benefit from extensive data, presented in easy-to-read and practical charts, tables and graphs.

How You Will Benefit from this Report
If your company is already competing in the HVAC industry, or uses these products, you will find this report invaluable, as it provides a comprehensive package of information and insight not offered in any other single source. You will gain a thorough understanding of the current market demand for HVAC equipment, as well as projected market demand and trends through 2010.

This report will help:

  • Marketing Managers identify market opportunities and develop targeted promotion plans for HVAC equipment.
  • Research and development professionals stay on top of competitor initiatives and explore demand for HVAC equipment.
  • Business development executives understand the dynamics of the market and identify possible partnerships.
  • Information and research center librarians provide market researchers, brand and product managers and other colleagues with the vital information they need to do their jobs more effectively.

Chapter 1 Executive Summary
Scope of the Report
Methodology
Market for HVAC Equipment
Figure 1-1 U.S. Market Supply of HVAC Equipment, by Shipment and Import-Export Values, 2001-2005 (in million $)
Category Growth
Unitary Air Conditioners and Ground Source Heat Pumps Lead Growth in Value
Heat Transfer Equipment Posted Big Gains in Volume but Not in Value
Room Air Conditioners and Dehumidifiers Declining in Value and Volume
Non-Electric Furnace Shipments Pick Up, While Room A/Cs Decline
Competitive Profiles
Industry Trends
A New Energy for the HVAC Industry
Impact of the 13 SEER on the HVAC Market
Heating Equipment Requirements
Other HVAC Requirements and Specifications
The Efficiency Paradox - What Drives Standard Changes?
Product Trends
Use of TXVs
Whole House Ventilation Systems
Outdoor Systems
Portable Air Conditioners
Future Trends
Geothermal HVAC Systems
Underfloor Air Distribution Systems
Ductless Air Conditioners
Solar Energy Systems
Sensor and Control Systems Improve HVAC Operations
Marketing Dynamics
New Product Introductions
Promotions and Trade Shows
AHR Expo
Comfortech
ISH North America
Power-Gen International
IAQA Annual Meeting & Exposition
Marketing 13 SEER
The Contractor - An Important Marketing Tool
Advertising HVAC
Associations and Organizations
American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)
Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute (ARI)
Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA)
Indoor Air Quality Association (IAQA)
End Users
85% of American Households Use Air Conditioners
Increased Construction Leads to More HVAC Installations
Strong Economy Boosts HVAC Installation
Remodeling Boosts HVAC Retrofit Installations
6% of Households Purchase HVAC Products
Usage Rate for Commercial Equals that for Residential
U.S. Non-Residential Construction Experiences All-Time High
Consumption Characteristics of Commercial Buildings
Market Size Projection and Outlook
Table 1-1 Projected U.S. Market Supply of HVAC Equipment, 2006-2010 (in billion $)


Chapter 2 The Market
Scope of the Report
Methodology
Product Definition and Classification
Market for HVAC Equipment Continues to Grow
Figure 2-1 Number of Air Conditioners and Heating Systems in Households, 1995-2005 (in millions)
Figure 2-1 U.S. Market Supply of HVAC Equipment, 2001-2005 (in billion $)
Figure 2-2 U.S. Market Supply of HVAC Equipment, by Shipment and Import-Export Values, 2001-2005 (in million $)
Category Growth
Unitary Air Conditioners and Ground Source Heat Pumps Lead Growth in Value
Heat Transfer Equipment Posted Big Gains in Volume but Not in Value
Room Air Conditioners and Dehumidifiers Declining in Value and Volume
Non-Electric Furnace Shipments Pick Up, While Room A/Cs Decline
Table 2-1 U.S. Shipment Values of HVAC Equipment by Category and Segment, 2001-2005, (in million $)
Table 2-2 U.S. Shipments of HVAC Equipment by Category and Segment, 2001-2005, (in number of units)
Imports
Major Sources of Imports
Figure 2-3 U.S. Imports of HVAC Equipment by Country, 2005
HVAC Equipment Imports in Value
Table 2-3 U.S. Imports of Air Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self-Contained, Less than 2.93 KW per Hour, 2002-2005 (in Thousand $)
Table 2-4 U.S. Imports of Air Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self-Contained, 2.93 KW/HR or Greater But Less than 4.98KW/HR, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-5 U.S. Imports of Air Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self-Contained, 2.98 KW/HR or Greater, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-6 U.S. Imports of Air Conditioning Machines, Window or Wall Type, Not Self-Contained, NESOI, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-7 U.S. Imports of Air Conditioners, Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit and a Valve for Reversal of the Cooling Cycle, Self Contained, Not Exceeding 17.58 KW/HR, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-8 U.S. Imports of Air Conditioning Machines Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit, and a Valve for Reversal of the Cooling/Heating Cycle, Window or Wall Types, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-9 U.S. Imports of Air Conditioners, Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit and a Valve for Reversal of the Cooling/Heat Cycle, Self-Contained, Exceeding 17.58 KW/HR, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-10 U.S. Imports of Air Conditioners, Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit and a Valve for Reversal of the Cooling/Heat Cycle, except Self-Contained, NESOI, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-11 U.S. Imports of Air Conditioners, Self-Contained Machines, and Remote Condenser Type, Other than Year-Round Units, Not Exceeding 17.58 KW/HR, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-12 U.S. Imports of Air Conditioners, Self-Contained Machines, and Remote Condenser Type, Other than Year-Round Units, Exceeding 17.58 KW/HR, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-13 U.S. Imports of Air Conditioners, Year-Round Units (Heating and Cooling) not Exceeding 17.58 KW/HR, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-14 U.S. Imports of Air Conditioners, Year-Round Units (Heating and Cooling) Exceeding 17.58 KW/HR, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-15 U.S. Imports of Room or Central Station Air Conditioning Units for Use with Water Chillers, NESOI, 2002-2005 (in Thousand $)
Table 2-16 U.S. Imports of Dehumidifiers Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit, Water Removal Capacity Less than 35 Liters over a 24 Hour Period, 2002-2005 (in Thousand $)
Table 2-17 U.S. Imports of Dehumidifiers Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit Water Removal Capacity of 35 Liters and More over a 24 Hour Period, 2002-2005 (in Thousand $)
Table 2-18 U.S. Imports of Air Conditioning Machines Not Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit, NESOI, 2002-2005 (in Thousand $)
Table 2-19 U.S. Imports of Air Humidifiers or Dehumidifiers, Not Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit, 2002-2005 (in Thousand $)
HVAC Equipment Imports in Units
Table 2-20 U.S. Imports of Air-Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self-Contained, Less Than 2.93 Kw per Hour (10000 Btu/Hr), 2002-2005 (In Thousands)
Table 2-21 U.S. Imports of Air-Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self-Contained, 2.93 Kw/Hr or Greater But Less Than 4.98kw/Hr (10000-16999 Btu/Hr), 2002-2005 (In Thousands)
Table 2-22 U.S. Imports of Dehumidifiers Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit, Water Removal Capacity Less Than 35 Liters over a 24 Hour Period, 2002-2005 (In Thousands)
Table 2-23 U.S. Imports of Dehumidifiers Incorporating A Refrigerating Unit, Water Removal Capacity of 35 Liters and More Over a 24 Hour Period, 2002-2005 (In Thousands)
Table 2-24 U.S. Imports of Air-Conditioners, Incorporating A Refrigerating Unit and a Valve For Reversal of The Cooling/Heat Cycle, Self-Contain, Not Exceeding 17.58 Kw/Hr, NESOI, 2002-2005 (In Thousands)
Table 2-25 U.S. Imports of Air-Conditioners, Incorporating A Refrigerating Unit and a Valve For Reversal of the Cooling/Heat Cycle, Self-Contained, Exceeding 17.58kw/Hr, NESOI, 2002-2005 (In Thousands)
Table 2-26 U.S. Imports of Air-Conditioners, Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit and a Valve for Reversal of The Cooling/Heat Cycle, Except Self-Contained, NESOI, 2002-2005 (In Thousands)
Table 2-27 U.S. Imports of Air-Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self-Contained, Less Than 2.93 Kw per Hour (10000 Btu/Hr), 2002-2005 (In Thousands)
Table 2-28 U.S. Imports of Air-Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self-Contained, 2.93 Kw/Hr or Greater But Less Than 4.98kw/Hr (10000-16999btu/Hr), 2002-2005 (In Thousands)
Table 2-29 U.S. Imports of Air-Conditioners, Window Or Wall Type, Self-Contained, 4.98 Kw/Hr or Greater (17000 Btu/Hr), 2002-2005 (In Thousands)
Table 2-30 U.S. Imports of Air Conditioning Machines Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit, and a Valve for Reversal of The Cooling/Heat Cycle, Window Or Wall Types, 2002-2005 (In Thousands)
Table 2-31 U.S. Imports of Air Conditioning Machines, Window or Wall Type, Not Self-contained, NESOI, 2002-2005 (In Thousands)
Table 2-32 U.S. Imports of Air-Conditioners, Self-Contained Machines and Remote Condenser Type, Other Than Year-Round Units, Not Exceeding 17.58 Kw/Hr (60000 Btu/Hr), NESOI, 2002-2005 (In Thousands)
Table 2-33 U.S. Imports of Air-Conditioners, Self-Contained Machines and Remote Condenser Type, Other Than Year-Round Units, Exceeding 17.58 Kw/Hr (60000 Btu/Hr), NESOI, 2002-2005 (In Thousands)
Table 2-34 U.S. Imports of Air-Conditioners, Year-Round Units (Heating and Cooling) Not Exceeding 17.58 Kw/Hr (60000 Btu/Hr), NESOI, 2002-2005 (In Thousands)
Table 2-35 U.S. Imports of Air-Conditioners, Year-Round Units (Heating and Cooling) Exceeding 17.58 Kw/Hr (60000 Btu/Hr), NESOI, 2002-2005 (In Thousands)
Table 2-36 U.S. Imports of Room or Central Station Air Conditioning Units for Use with Water Chillers, NESOI, 2002-2005 (In Thousands)
Table 2-37 U.S. Imports of Air Conditioning Machines Not Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit, NESOI, 2002-2005 (In Thousands)
Table 2-38 U.S. Imports of Air Humidifiers or Dehumidifiers, Not Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit, 2002-2005 (In Thousands)
Exports
Major Export Markets
Figure 2-4 U.S. Exports of HVAC Equipment, by Country, 2005
HVAC Equipment Exports in Value
Table 2-39 U.S. Exports of Air Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self-Contained, Less than 2.93 KW per Hour, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-40 U.S. Exports of Air Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self-Contained, 2.93 KW/HR or Greater but less than 4.98 KW/HR, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-41 U.S. Exports of Air Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self Contained, 4.98 KW/HR or Greater, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-42 U.S. Exports of Air Conditioning Machines Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit, and a Valve for Reversal of the Cooling/Heating Cycle, Window or Wall Types, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-43 U.S. Exports of Air Conditioning Machines, Window or Wall Type, Not Self Contained, NESOI, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-44 U.S. Exports of Air Conditioners, Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit and a Valve for Reversal of the Cooling/Heat Cycle, Self Contained, not exceeding 17.58 KW/HR, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-45 U.S. Exports of Air Conditioners, Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit and a Valve for Reversal of the Cooling/Heat Cycle, Self Contained, exceeding 17.58 KW/HR, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-46 U.S. Exports of Air Conditioners, Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit and a Valve for Reversal of the Cooling/Heat Cycle, except Self-Contained, NESOI, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-47 U.S. Exports of Air Conditioners, Self Contained Machines and Remote Condenser Type, Other than Year Round Units, Not Exceeding 17.58 KW/HR, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-48 U.S. Exports of Air Conditioners, Self Contained Machines and Remote Condensers, Other than Year Round Units, Exceeding 17.58 KW/HR, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-49 U.S. Exports of Air Conditioners, Year-Round Units (Heating and Cooling) not exceeding 17.58 KW/HR, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-50 U.S. Exports of Air Conditioners, Year-Round Units (Heating and Cooling) exceeding 17.58 KW/HR, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-51 U.S. Exports of Room or Central Station Air Conditioning Units for Use with Water Chillers, NESOI, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-52 U.S. Exports of Dehumidifiers Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-53 U.S. Exports of Air Conditioning Machines Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit, NESOI, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-54 U.S. Exports of Air Conditioning Machines not Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit, NESOI, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
Table 2-55 U.S. Exports of Air Humidifiers or Dehumidifiers, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)
HVAC Equipment Exports in Units
Table 2-56 U.S. Exports of Air-Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self-Contained, Less Than 2.93 Kw Per Hour (10000 Btu/Hr) (In Thousands)
Table 2-57 U.S. Exports of Air-Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self-Contained, 2.93 Kw/Hr or Greater But Less Than 4.98kw/Hr (10000-16999btu/Hr) (In Thousands)
Table 2-58 U.S. Exports of Air-Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self-Contained, 4.98 Kw/Hr or Greater (17000 Btu/Hr) (In Thousands)
Table 2-59 U.S. Exports of Air Conditioning Machines Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit, And a Valve for Reversal Of The Cooling/Heat Cycle, Window Or Wall Types (In Thousands)
Table 2-60 U.S. Exports of Air Conditioning Machines, Window or Wall Type, Not Self Contained, Nesoi (In Thousands)
Table 2-61 U.S. Exports of Air-Conditioners, Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit and a Valve for Reversal of The Cooling/Heat Cycle, Self-Contain, Not Excding 17.58 Kw/Hr, Nesoi (In Thousands)
Table 2-62 U.S. Exports of Air-Conditioners, Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit and a Valve for Reversal of the Cooling/Heat Cycle, Self-Contained, Exceeding 17.58 Kw/Hr, Nesoi (In Thousands)
Table 2-63 U.S. Exports of Air-Conditioners, Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit and a Valve for Reversal of The Cooling/Heat Cycle, Except Self-Contained, Nesoi (In Thousands)
Table 2-64 U.S. Exports of Air-Conditioners, Self-Contained Machines and Remote Condenser Type, Other Than Year-Round Units, Not Exceeding 17.58 Kw/Hr (60000 Btu/Hr), Nesoi (In Thousands)
Table 2-65 U.S. Exports of Air-Conditioners, Self-Contained Machines and Remote Condenser Type, Other Than Year-Round Units, Exceeding 17.58 Kw/Hr (60000 Btu/Hr), Nesoi (In Thousands)
Table 2-66 U.S. Exports of Air-Conditioners, Year-Round Units (Heating and Cooling) Not Exceeding 17.58 Kw/Hr (60000 Btu/Hr), Nesoi (In Thousands)
Table 2-67 U.S. Exports of Air-Conditioners, Year-Round Units (Heating and Cooling) Exceeding 17.58 Kw/Hr (60000 Btu/Hr), Nesoi (In Thousands)
Table 2-68 U.S. Exports of Room or Central Station Air Conditioning Units for Use with Water Chillers, Nesoi (In Thousands)
Table 2-69 U.S. Exports of Dehumidifiers Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit (In Thousands)
Table 2-70 U.S. Exports of Air Conditioning Machines Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit, Nesoi (In Thousands)
Table 2-71 U.S. Exports of Air Conditioning Machines Not Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit, Nesoi (In Thousands)
Table 2-72 U.S. Exports of Air Humidifiers or Dehumidifiers (In Thousands)
Factors Influencing the Market
13 SEER Drives Market Growth
Construction Market Lends its Growth to HVAC
Figure 2-5 U.S. Total Monthly Value of Construction, 2005 (in billion $)
Home Remodeling Will Add to Growth Contributed by Construction
Figure 2-6 Energy-Saving Remodeling Products & Fixtures Installed in 2005 (%)
Technology Driving the HVAC Market
HVAC Market Under the Weather
Market Supply Projection and Outlook
Figure 2-5 U.S. Projected Market for HVAC Equipment, 2006-2010 (in billion $)
Table 2-37 Projected U.S. Market Supply of HVAC Equipment, 2006-2010 (in billion $)
Table 2-38 Projected U.S. Shipments for HVAC Equipment, by category, 2006-2010 (in billion $)


Chapter 3 Competitive Profiles
Overview
American Standard Companies Inc.
Overview
Performance
Figure 3-1 Annual U.S. Revenues of American Standard Companies, 2001-2005 (in billion $)
Table 3-1 American Standard’s Commercial HVAC Product Portfolio
Table 3-2 American Standard’s Residential HVAC Product Portfolio
Table 3-3 Trane’s Commercial HVAC Product Portfolio
Table 3-4 Trane’s Residential HVAC Product Portfolio
New Products & Services
Trane Launches Air Purifiers
Temporary Cooling is in
Serving the Commercial Sector
Trane Good for Health
Updating Trane
Company Snapshot
The Goodwill Factor
Trane Woos the Restaurant Industry
Environmental Initiatives
United Technologies Corporation
Overview
Performance
Figure 3-2 Annual U.S. Revenues of United Technologies Corporation, 2001-2005 (in billion $)
Table 3-5 Carrier’s HVAC Product Portfolio
Carrier’s New Products
Toshiba & Carrier Collectively Launch SMMS
The Turnkey Optimization Program
Carrier Unveils its 13-SEER Products at “Power 2006” Convention
Environmental Initiatives
Carrier Announces Decision to Acquire CommAir
Johnson Controls
Overview
Performance
Figure 3-3 Annual Revenues of Johnson Controls HVAC Division, 2001-2005 (in billion $)
Table 3-6 York’s Commercial HVAC Product Portfolio
Table 3-7 York’s Residential HVAC Product Portfolio
Snapshot
New Product & Service Introductions
Unitary Product Group
The DiagnosTech Platform
Replacing the HCFC-123 refrigerant
Johnson Controls to Deliver Heat Recovery System for Nova Scotia Pulp Mill
Major Acquisitions
Lennox International, Inc.
Overview
Performance
Figure 3-4 Annual Revenues of Lennox International, Inc. HVAC equipment, 2001-2005 (in billion $)
Table 3-8 Lennox’s Commercial HVAC Product Portfolio
Table 3-9 Lennox’s Residential HVAC Product Portfolio
Company Snapshot
New Product Introductions
Lennox Achieves Highest Efficiency
Lennox Introduces IAQ Systems
Lennox Launches Commercial Products at the AHR Expo 2006
Environmental & Energy-Saving Initiatives
How Clean is the Air in Your Home
Goodman Global, Inc.
Overview
Performance
Figure 3-5 Annual Revenues of Goodman Global, Inc., 2001-2005 (in billion $)
Table 3-10 Goodman Global’s HVAC Product Portfolio
Company Snapshot
Goodman Cuts Costs to Keep Prices Low
Goodman Introduces the First Wireless PTAC Management Product
Servicing Distributors and Contractors
Advocating the 13 SEER Protocol
Paloma Industries
Overview
Performance
Figure 3-6 Annual Revenues of Paloma Industries, Inc., 2001-2005 (in billion $)
Table 3-11 Rheem’s Commercial HVAC Product Portfolio
Table 3-12 Rheem’s Residential HVAC Product Portfolio
Table 3-13 Ruud’s Commercial HVAC Product Portfolio
Table 3-14 Ruud’s Residential HVAC Product Portfolio
Company Snapshot
New Product Introductions
Consumer Programs
Mass Customization Strategy Increases Rheem’s Market Share
LG Electronics, Inc.
Overview
Performance
Figure 3-7 Annual U.S. Revenues of LG Electronics, 2001-2005 (in billion $)
Table 3-15 LG’s HVAC Product Portfolio
Company Snapshot
LG at Madame Tussauds
Life Indeed is Good
Strategic Alliances
Advertising Campaigns
Imitating Art
Environmental Initiatives
Whirlpool Corporation
Overview
Performance
Figure 3-8 Annual Revenue of Whirlpool Corp.’s HVAC Division, 2001-2005 (in billion $)
Table 3-16 Whirlpool’s HVAC Product Portfolio
Table 3-17 Maytag’s HVAC Product Portfolio
Company Snapshot
Whirlpool Re-launches Insideavantage.com
Whirlpool Joins Hands with Environmental Pioneers
Whirlpool Acquires Maytag, Asserts Position in HVAC Market
Nortek Holdings, Inc.
Overview
Performance
Figure 3-9 Annual Revenues of Nortek Holdings, Inc., 2001-2005 (in billion $)
Table 3-18 Nordyne’s HVAC Brand/Product Portfolio
Company Snapshot
Nordyne Launches Products at the “Feel the Power” Meet in San Francisco
Creating Brand Awareness
Major Acquisitions
Daikin Industries
Overview
Performance
Figure 3-10 Annual Revenue of Daikin Industries, Inc.’s HVAC Division, 2001-2005 (in billion $)
Table 3-19 Daikin’s Commercial HVAC Product Portfolio
Table 3-20 Daikin’s Residential HVAC Product Portfolio
Table 3-21 Daikin’s VRV System Product Portfolio
Company Snapshot
Daikin’s VRV Innovation
Daikin Chooses Fairchild Semiconductor’s SPM for Inverter-Based Systems
Strategic Alliance with American Standard
Environmental Initiatives
Daikin aspires to be Market Leader after Acquisition of OYL Industries


Chapter 4 Marketing Dynamics
Market Flooded with a Host of New Products
Table 4-1 New Product Introductions by Major HVAC Manufacturers, (2005-2006)
Promotions and Trade Shows
AHR Expo
Comfortech
ISH North America
Power-Gen International
IAQA Annual Meeting & Exposition
Marketing 13 SEER
Figure 4-1 Various Marketing Plans of HVAC Contractors and Distributors (executed singularly or otherwise)
Goodman Global Promotes 13 SEER
Take the Fear Out of 13 SEER
Getting SEERious
The Contractor - An Important Marketing Tool
Mitsubishi Holds Distributor & Contractor Conference
Advertising HVAC
Mitsubishi’s Mr. Slim on TV
Taco Advertises “Green”
Trane Launches Air Purifiers at New York Event
LG Promotes its ArtCool Designs of Air Conditioners
Fall Promotions
Newsletters Gain Prominence
Associations and Organizations
American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)
Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute (ARI)
Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA)
Indoor Air Quality Association (IAQA)


Chapter 5 Industry and Market Trends
A New Energy for the HVAC Industry
Why 13 SEER for Residential Equipment
Figure 5-1 Electrical System Energy Losses by Residential & Commercial Equipment, 2001-2005 (in trillion Btu)
Measures to Achieve 13 SEER
Figure 5-2 Power Input vs. Evaporator Air Flow Rate (At 82°F Outdoor Air Temperature)
What HVAC Manufacturers are Doing
Sensor and Control Systems Improve HVAC Operations
Overcoming Challenges
Impact of the 13 SEER on the HVAC Market
Heating Equipment Requirements
Other HVAC Requirements and Specifications
The Efficiency Paradox - What Drives Standard Changes?
Energy Policy Act Adds Spark to the HVAC Industry
Table 5-1 Tax Credits for Energy Efficiencies of Various HVAC Equipment
Impact of the Energy Policy Act 2005 on the HVAC Industry
Other Government Initiatives
Table 5-2 Local Government Initiated HVAC Programs in 2005 (National Summary)
HVAC’s Tradeoff with the Environment
Refrigerants Used in HVAC Systems and Their Environmental Effects
Table 5-3 Ozone Depletion Potential and Global Warming Potentials of Refrigerants (100-year Values)*
The Phasing Out of HCFC Refrigerants
Figure 5-3 Projected Consumption of R-22 Refrigerant in Air conditioners & Heat Pumps (in thousand metric tons)*
CO2- The Next Generation Green Refrigerant
Indoor Air Quality - A Growing Interest
Measures to Improve Indoor Air Quality in Homes
The Impact of the IAQ Trend on the HVAC Market
Welcome to the Control Zone
Communication Improvement Lead to Great Consumer Control
Intelligent Remote Control via the Internet
oBIX: Networking HVAC
HVAC Industry Adopts the gbXML Standard
HVAC - The Comfort Market
Integrated Comfort Systems Grab Attention
HVAC Designs to Appeal to the Aesthetically Inclined Consumers
Industry Enters the Quiet Comfort Era
Rising Prices Heat Up HVAC Market
Figure 5-4 Producer Price Indices for Air Conditioning & Heat Transfer Equipment, 2001-2005
Figure 5-5 Producer Price Indices for Air Conditioning & Heat Transfer Equipment, January-October, 2006
Figure 5-6 Producer Price Indices for Unitary Air Conditioners, 2001-2005
Figure 5-7 Producer Price Indices for Unitary Air Conditioners, January-October, 2006
Unprecedented Increase in Cost of Raw Materials
Figure 5-8 Producer Price Index for Cold Rolled Steel Sheet & Strip, Copper & Copper Base Alloy Pipe & Tube, and Aluminum Sheet and Strip, 2001-2005
Figure 5-9 Producer Price Index for Cold Rolled Steel Sheet & Strip, January-October, 2006
Figure 5-10 Producer Price Index for Copper & Copper Base Alloy Pipe & Tube, January-October, 2006
Figure 5-11 Producer Price Index for Aluminum Sheet & Strip, January-October, 2006
Soaring HVAC Component Prices
Figure 5-12 Producer Price Index for Parts, Accessories & Components for Air conditioning and Heat Transfer Equipment, 2001-2005
Figure 5-13 Producer Price Index for Parts, Accessories & Components for Air Conditioning and Heat Transfer Equipment, 2001-2005
Product Trends
The Use of Thermal Expansion Valves (TXVs)
Whole House Ventilation Systems
Outdoor HVAC Systems
HVAC Systems - An Architectural Misfit?
Portable Air Conditioners
The Future of HVAC Technology
Geothermal HVAC Systems
Table 5-4 Capital and Operating Costs of Geothermal HVAC Systems (in $)
Underfloor Air Distribution Systems
Table 5-5 Types of UFAD Systems
Ductless Air Conditioners
Solar Energy Systems


Chapter 6 End User
Overview
Residential Use
85% of American Households Use Air Conditioners
Figure 6-1 Percentage of U.S. Households Owning Air Conditioning Units (%)
Figure 6-2 U.S. Residential Energy Consumption, 2001-2005 (in trillion Btu)
Figure 6-3 U.S. Residential Energy Consumption, First Half of 2006 (in trillion Btu)
Increased Construction Leads to More HVAC Installations
Table 6-1 Residential HVAC System Utilization (in thousand housing units)
Figure 6-4 U.S. Total Residential Construction, 2001-2005 (in million $)
Figure 6-5 U.S. Total Residential Construction, January-June, 2006 (in million $)
Consumption Characteristics of Residential Buildings
Figure 6-6 Residential Building Primary Electric Energy Breakdown, 2005 (%)
Figure 6-7 Households with Selected HVAC Appliances in 2005, (%)
Figure 6-8 Type of Air Conditioning Equipment Used by U.S. Households, 2005 (E)
Characteristics of Residential HVAC Consumers
Strong Economy Boosts HVAC Installation
Figure 6-9 U.S. Residential HVAC Expenditures, 2001-2005, (in billion $)
Mutli-Family Apartments Use More HVAC Energy
Table 6-3 U.S. Residential Energy Consumption According to Housing Type (in million Btu)
South and Southwest Greatest Users of Air Conditioning
Table 6-2 Average Regional Expenditures for Households having Electric Air Conditioning, (in million $), 2001
HVAC Consumption According to Climatic Zones
Table 6-4 Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in U.S. Households According to Climate Zone
Table 6-5 Space Heating Energy Consumption in U.S. Households According to Climate Zone
Type of Fuel Used For Residential Heating Systems
Figure 6-10 Type of Fuel Used for Heating Systems in Occupied Housing Units, 2005 (%)
Survey Reveals Growing Popularity of Electric & Geothermal Heating Systems
Remodeling Boosts HVAC Retrofit Installations
Figure 6-11 U.S. Quarterly Expenditures for Maintenance and Repairs and Improvements, 2004-2006 (in billion $)
Figure 6-12 U.S. Residential HVAC Retrofit Expenditures, 2001-2005, (in billion $)
5.5% of Households Purchase HVAC Products
Table 6-6 Annual Purchasing Rates for Selected HVAC Products, 2004-2006 (U.S. households)
Table 6-7 Purchasing Rates for HVAC Products in Last 12 Months: By Home Purchasing, Refinancing, or Remodeling Activity and by Value of Residence, 2006 (U.S. home-owning households)
Non-Residential End Use
Figure 6-13 U.S. Commercial Energy Consumption (in trillion Btu)
Figure 6-14 Percentage of U.S. Commercial Buildings With Cooling systems(s), 1999-2005 (E)(%)
Figure 6-15 Percentage of U.S. Commercial Buildings with Heating Systems(s), 1999-2005 (E) (%)
U.S. Non-Residential Construction Experiences All-Time High
Figure 6-16 U.S. Total Non-Residential Construction, 2001-2005 (in million $)
Figure 6-17 U.S. Total Non-Residential Construction, January-June, 2006, (In million $)
Table 6-8 U.S. Non-Residential Construction, by Type (in million $), 2002-2005
Table 6-9 U.S. Non-Residential Construction, by Type (In Million $), January-June, 2006
Consumption Characteristics of Commercial Buildings
Figure 6-18 Commercial Building Primary Energy Use Breakdown, 2005 (%)
Space Heating Equipment
Figure 6-19 Commercial Building Heating Equipment Use, 2005 (%)
Cooling Equipment
Figure 6-20 Commercial Building Cooling Equipment Breakdown, 2005 (%)
Consumption Characteristics of Commercial Users
Table 6-10 Commercial Buildings HVAC Consumption, by End Use, in 2005 (E), (in trillion Btu)
Educational Institutions
Figure 6-21 U.S. School Buildings Heating Equipment Breakdown, 2005 (E), (%) (More than one may apply)
Figure 6-22 U.S. School Buildings Cooling Equipment Breakdown, 2005 (E), (%) (More than one may apply)
Food & Beverage Service Industry
Figure 6-23 U.S. Food & Beverage Service Outlets Heating Equipment Breakdown, 2005 (E), (%) (More than one may apply)
Figure 6-24 U.S. Food & Beverage Service Outlets Cooling Equipment Breakdown, 2005 (E), (%) (More than one may apply)
Healthcare Facilities
Figure 6-25 U.S. Healthcare Facilities Heating Equipment Breakdown, 2005 (E), (%) (More than one may apply)
Figure 6-26 U.S. Healthcare Facilities Cooling Equipment Breakdown, 2005 (E), (%) (More than one may apply)
Lodging Facilities
Figure 6-27 U.S. Lodging Facilities Heating Equipment Breakdown, 2005 (E), (%) (More than one may apply)
Figure 6-28 U.S. Lodging Facilities Cooling Equipment Breakdown, 2005 (E), (%) (More than one may apply)
Commercial HVAC Equipment Use by Geography
Figure 6-29 U.S. Commercial Buildings HVAC Equipment Breakdown, by Census Region, 2005, (%)
Energy Sources Used for Commercial HVAC
Figure 6-30 Type of Fuel Used by Commercial Buildings for HVAC Equipment in the U.S., 2005 (%)
Optimal HVAC Practices

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