Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable

 
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Published Jan 1, 1998 | 146 Pages | Pub ID: SB332

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Manufacturers and marketers of power, building, and apparatus wire and cable are expected to see strong profit margins over the next five years. Specialists in Business Information takes an in-depth look at over 35 product lines from high-voltage power cables to extension cords. Sales opportunities are evaluated in the investigation of construction, utility, and OEM end-use markets. SBI supplies data on construction market potential, world market potential, export trends, cost structure and profitability, material input prices, and growth strategies. The profile also includes an analysis of over 25 worldwide manufacturers.
Section 1: Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable Industry Trends
Executive Summary
Sector Size and Growth Analysis
Factors Driving Demand
Industry Profitability
Competitive Strategies
Outlook 5
Table 1-1 Value of U.S. Insulated Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable Shipments by Sector: 1972-2002 (dollars)
Table 1-2 Power, Building, and Apparatus Products' Share of Total U.S. Insulated Wire and Cable Shipments: 1972-2002 (dollars and percent)
Table 1-3 Value of U.S. Insulated Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable Shipments by Sector: 1972-2002 (dollars)
Table 1-4 Copper and Aluminum Content of U.S. Insulated Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable Shipments by Sector: 1977-2002 (pounds)
Table 1-5 Content of U.S. Insulated Power and Building Wire and Cable Shipped by Material: 1977-2002 (dollars): Copper and Aluminum
Table 1-6 U.S. Producer Price Trends for Insulated Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable: 1987-1997 (index)
Table 1-7 Projected Growth Rates for U.S. Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable for 35 Product Categories: 1997-2002 (percent)
Scope and Methodology

Section 2: U.S. Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable Sector Shipments
Summary of Major Findings
Power Wire and Cable
Building Wire and Cable
Apparatus Wire and Cordage
Table 2-1 Value of U.S. Insulated Power Wire and Cable Shipments by Type: 1972-2002 (dollars)
Table 2-2 Value of U.S. Plastic and Rubber Insulated Power Wire and Cable Shipments 600 Volts or Less by Type: 1972-2002 (dollars): Portable Welding Cable, Portable Power Cable, Underground Distribution Cable, Thermoplastic Insulated, Thermoset Insulated, and Other Types
Table 2-3 Value of U.S. Plastic and Rubber Thermoset Insulated Power Wire and Cable Shipments 600 Volts or Less by Type: 1972-1997 (dollars): Armored, Unarmored Rubber, and Unarmored Cross-Linked
Table 2-4 Value of U.S. Plastic and Rubber Insulated Power Wire and Cable Shipments Over 600 Volts by Type: 1972-2002 (dollars): Portable Power Cable, Underground Distribution Cable, Thermoplastic Insulated, and Thermoset Insulated
Table 2-5 Value of U.S. Plastic and Rubber Thermoset Insulated Power Wire and Cable Shipments Over 600 Volts by Voltage Category: 1972-1997 (dollars): Over 600 Volts to 15 KV and Over 15 KV
Table 2-6 Value of U.S. Plastic and Rubber Thermoset Insulated Power Wire and Cable Shipments Over 600 Volts Up to 15 KV by Type: 1977-1997 (dollars): Armored, Unarmored Rubber, and Unarmored Cross-Linked
Table 2-7 Copper Content of U.S. Insulated Power Wire and Cable Shipped by Type: 1992-1996 (pounds): Portable, Underground Distribution, Thermoplastic Insulated, Thermoset Insulated by Type, and Other Types; and by Voltage Category
Table 2-8 Aluminum Content of U.S. Insulated Power Wire and Cable Shipped by Type: 1992-1996 (pounds): Underground Distribution Cable, Thermoset Insulated Service Drop Cable, and Thermoset Insulated Power Cable
Table 2-9 Value of U.S. Insulated Building Wire and Cable Shipments by Type: 1972-2002 (dollars): Thermoset Insulated, Thermoplastic Insulated, Service Entrance Cable, Nonmetallic Branch- Circuit, Metallic Armored Cable, and Other Types
Table 2-10 Value of U.S. Thermoplastic Insulated Building Wire and Cable Shipments by Type: 1977-1997 (dollars): Flame-Retardant Nylon, and Moisture and Heat Resistant
Table 2-11 Value of U.S. Thermoset Insulated Building Wire and Cable Shipments by Type: 1977-1997 (dollars): XHHW and Use Cross-Linked Polyethylene
Table 2-12 Value of U.S. Nonmetallic Branch-Circuit and Underground Feeder Building Wire and Cable Shipments: 1977-1997 (dollars): Type NM-B, and Type UF and NMC
Table 2-13 Copper and Aluminum Content of U.S. Insulated Building Wire and Cable Shipped by Type: 1992-1996 (pounds): Thermoset Insulated by Type, Thermoplastic Insulated by Type, Service Entrance Cable, Nonmetallic Branch-Circuit, Metallic Armored Cable, and Other Types
Table 2-14 Value of U.S. Insulated Apparatus Wire and Cordage Shipments by Type: 1972-2002 (dollars): Flexible Cordage, Apparatus Wire, Submersible Pump Cable, and Other Products
Table 2-15 Value of U.S. Insulated Flexible Cordage Shipments by Type: 1972-2002 (dollars): Thermoset Insulated, Thermoplastic, Extension Cord Sets, Fixed Power Supply Cords, Detachable Power Supply Cords, and Others
Table 2-16 Value of U.S. Insulated Apparatus Wire Shipments by Type: 1972-2002 (dollars): Appliance Fixture Wire and Appliance Wiring Material
Table 2-17 Copper Content of U.S. Insulated Apparatus Wire and Cordage Shipped by Type: 1992-1996 (pounds): Thermoset and Thermoplastic Insulated Flexible Cordage, Extension Cord Sets, Fixed Power Supply Cords, Detachable Power Supply Cords, Other Flexible Cordage, Appliance Fixture Wire, Appliance Wiring Material, Submersible Pump Cable, and Others
Table 2-18 Average U.S. Value per Pound of Copper Content Shipped in Insulated Apparatus Wire and Cordage by Type: 1992-1996 (dollars): Thermoset and Thermoplastic Insulated Flexible Cordage, Extension Cord Sets, Fixed Power Supply Cords, Detachable Power Supply Cords, Other Flexible Cordage, Appliance Fixture Wire, Appliance Wiring Material, Submersible Pump Cable, and Others
Table 2-19 U.S. Producer Price Trends for Insulated Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable by Type: 1992-1997 (index): Power Thermoplastic and Thermoset Insulated Cable by Voltage, Thermoset and Thermoplastic Insulated Building Wire and Cable, Nonmetallic Branch-Circuit Underground Feeder, Flexible Cordage by Type, and Appliance Fixture Wire

Section 3: End-Use Markets and Factors Driving Domestic Demand
Summary of Major Findings
Construction Markets
Utility Markets
Electrical Contractors
Original Equipment Manufacturer Markets
Table 3-1 Real U.S. Spending on Building Construction: 1977-1997 (dollars): Total Building, Residential Buildings, and Nonresidential Buildings
Table 3-2 Real U.S. Spending on Building Construction by Type of Structure: 1993-1997 (dollars): Residential and Nonresidential Buildings by Type, Private and Public Buildings by Type
Table 3-3 Total U.S. Housing Demand by Sector and by Region: 1992-1997 (units): Existing Home Resales, New Housing Units Completed, and Mobile Home Placements
Table 3-4 New U.S. Privately Owned Housing Units Started and by Type of Structure: 1980-1997 (number): Total Starts, and in Structures With 1 Unit, 2 Units, 3 and 4 Units, and 5 Units or More
Table 3-5 Monthly Private U.S. Housing Units Authorized by 19,000 Building Permit Places and by Region: 1996 and 1997 (number): Total U.S., Northeast, Midwest, South, and West
Table 3-6 Average Size per New U.S. Housing Unit by Type of Unit and by Region: 1985-1996 (square feet): One-Family Homes, Multifamily Housing Units, and Mobile Homes
Table 3-7 U.S. Home Mortgage Interest Rates and Personal Income: 1980-1997 (percent and dollars): New Home Mortgage Interest Rates and Real Disposable Personal Income
Table 3-8 U.S. Residential Property Spending on Electrical Alterations and Repairs by Owners and Renters: 1993-1997 (dollars): Total Building, Residential Buildings, and Nonresidential Buildings
Table 3-9 U.S. Wholesale Sales of Electrical Interior Wiring and Number Carrying Line: 1977-1997 (number and dollars)
Table 3-10 U.S. Construction Spending on Electrical Utilities and Other Public Facilities: 1987-1997 (dollars): Electric Utilities, Streets and Highways, Telecommunications Facilities, Railroads, Gas and Petroleum Pipelines, and Other Facilities
Table 3-11 Construction Spending on Transmission and Distribution by Investor-Owned Electric Utilities: 1977-1996 (dollars)
Table 3-12 U.S. Electric Power Industry Net Generation: 1977-1997 (kilowatt-hours): Total, Electric Utilities, and Nonutility Producers
Table 3-13 U.S. Electrical Contractor Revenues by New, Alteration, and Repair Construction Work: 1977-1997 (dollars)
Table 3-14 Revenues of U.S. Electrical Work Contractors by Type of Construction Work: 1987-1997 (dollars): Residential Buildings by Type, Nonresidential Buildings by Type, Power and Communication Lines and Towers, Streets and Highways, Power Plants, and Other Nonbuilding Construction
Table 3-15 Revenues of U.S. Electrical Contractors by State: 1987-1997
Table 3-16 Number and Average Construction Revenues of U.S. Electrical Contractors by State: 1987-1997
Table 3-17 Insulated Copper Wire and Cable Purchased for Eighteen U.S. End-Use Markets: 1982-1997 (dollars): Power Tools, Electrical Distribution Equipment, Motors, Controls, Appliances, Wiring Devices, Lighting Fixtures, Engine Electrical Equipment, and Other Electrical Equipment
Table 3-18 U.S. Production Trends for Major Apparatus Wire and Cordage End-Use Markets: 1993-1997 (index): Industrial Equipment, Computer and Office Equipment, Electric Distribution and Industrial Apparatus, Household Appliances, Audio and Video Equipment, and Other Electrical Supplies

Section 4: U.S. and Canadian International Trade Activity
Summary of Major Findings
U.S. Exports
U.S. Imports
Canadian Imports and Exports
Table 4-1 U.S. Exports of Insulated Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable by Voltage Rating: 1989-1997 (dollars): Less Than 80 Volts, 80 to 1,000 Volts, and Over 1,000 Volts
Table 4-2 U.S. Exports of Insulated Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable by Voltage Rating and by Type: 1992-1997 (pounds and dollars): 80 Volts or Less With and Without Connectors, Over 80 Volts to 1,000 Volts With and Without Connectors by Material, and Over 1,000 Volts With and Without Connectors by Material
Table 4-3 U.S. Exports of Insulated Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable of 80 Volts or Less for the Top Fifteen Countries of Destination: 1992-1997 (dollars)
Table 4-4 U.S. Exports of Insulated Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable Over 80 Volts Up to 1,000 Volts for the Top Eighteen Countries of Destination: 1992-1997 (dollars)
Table 4-5 U.S. Exports of Insulated Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable Over 1,000 Volts for the Top Fifteen Countries of Destination: 1992-1997 (dollars)
Table 4-6 U.S. Imports of Insulated Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable by Voltage Rating: 1989-1997 (dollars): Less Than 80 Volts, 80 to 1,000 Volts, and Over 1,000 Volts
Table 4-7 U.S. Imports of Insulated Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable by Voltage Rating and by Type: 1992-1997 (pounds and dollars): 80 Volts or Less With and Without Connectors, Over 80 Volts to 1,000 Volts With and Without Connectors by Material, and Over 1,000 Volts With and Without Connectors by Material
Table 4-8 U.S. Imports of Insulated Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable of 80 Volts or Less for the Top Ten Countries of Origin: 1992-1997 (dollars)
Table 4-9 U.S. Imports of Insulated Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable Over 80 Volts Up to 1,000 Volts for the Top Ten Countries of Origin: 1992-1997 (dollars)
Table 4-10 U.S. Imports of Insulated Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable of Over 1,000 Volts for the Top Ten Countries of Origin: 1992-1997 (dollars)
Table 4-11 Canadian Exports of Electric Conductors by Voltage Rating: 1991-1996 (Canadian dollars): Total Exports, Percent Shipped to U.S., 80 Volts or Less, Over 80 Volts to 1,000 Volts, and Over 1,000 Volts
Table 4-12 Canadian Exports of Electric Conductors by Voltage Rating and by Major Country of Destination: 1992-1996 (Canadian dollars): 80 Volts or Less With and Without Connectors, Over 80 Volts to 1,000 Volts With and Without Connectors, and Over 1,000 Volts
Table 4-13 Canadian Imports of Electric Conductors by Voltage Rating: 1991-1996 (Canadian dollars): Total Imports, Percent Shipped From U.S., 80 Volts or Less, Over 80 Volts to 1,000 Volts, and Over 1,000 Volts
Table 4-14 Canadian Imports of Electric Conductors by Voltage Rating and by Major Country of Origin: 1992-1996 (Canadian dollars): 80 Volts or Less With and Without Connectors, Over 80 Volts to 1,000 Volts With and Without Connectors, and Over 1,000 Volts

Section 5: Cost Structure and Profitability of U.S. Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable Plants
Summary of Major Findings
Plant Operating Ratios and Profit Margins
Material Input Costs
Plant Labor Situation
Table 5-1 Operating Ratios of U.S. Insulated Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable Plants: 1977-1997 (percent): Payroll and Material Costs AS a Percent of Plant Shipments
Table 5-2 Gross Profit Margins of U.S. Insulated Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable Plants: 1977-1997 (percent)
Table 5-3 U.S. Producer Price Trends for Major Material Inputs: 1990-1997 (index): Base Copper Wire and Cable, Bare Aluminum Wire and Cable, and Plastics Resins
Table 5-4 U.S. Monthly Producer Price Trends for Primary Copper Materials: 1995-1997 (index)
Table 5-5 Labor Situation at U.S. Insulated Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable Plants: 1977-1997 (number and dollars): Number of Employees, Shipments per Employee, Production Workers Percent Total Employees, Average Hourly Wages, and Average Weekly Hours
Table 5-6 U.S. Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable Plant New Capital Expenditures: 1977-1997 (dollars and percent): Total New Capital Expenditures and Percent Value Added

Section 6: U.S. Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable Industry Competitive Environment
Summary of Major Findings
Industry Plants and Manufacturers
Top Industry Players and Their Competitive Strategy
Table 6-1 Number and Revenues of U.S. Insulated Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable Plants: 1977-1997 (number and dollars): Number of Employees, Shipments per Employee, Production Workers Percent Total Employees, Average Hourly Wages, and Average Weekly Hours
Table 6-2 Number of U.S. Copper-Content Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable Manufacturers by Sector and Type: 1987-1996 (number): Power Wire and Cable by Type, Building Wire and Cable by Type, and Apparatus Wire and Cable by Type
Table 6-3 Number of U.S. Aluminum-Content Power and Building Wire and Cable Manufacturers by Sector and Type: 1987-1996 (number): Underground Distribution, Service Drop Cable, and Thermoset Insulated
Table 6-4 Select Company Market Shares of U.S. Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable Sectors: 1996 (percent)
Table 6-5 Sales and Profit Trends for Six U.S. Power, Building, and Apparatus Wire and Cable Manufacturers: 1993-1997 (dollars and percent)

Section 7: Competitor Intelligence: Company Profiles and Recent Developments
Summary of Major Findings
Rationalization to Boost Power Wire and Cable Product Profit Margins
Capital Investments to Improve Operating Efficiency
Acquisitions to Expand Capabilities
New Products to Extend Product Lines
Research and Development Spending on Superconductors
Joint Ventures to Exploit Growing World Markets
Sources, Methodology, and Objectives
AFC Cable Systems, Inc.
Alcan Aluminum Ltd.
Alcatel Alsthom Compagnie Generale D'Electricite
Alcatel STK AS
American Superconductor Corp.
Belden, Inc.
Bicc PLC
Delta PLC
Draka Holding NV
Encore Wire Corp.
Ericsson (Telefonaktiebolaget LM)
Essex International, Inc.
Fujikura Ltd.
General Cable Corp.
Hitachi Cable Ltd.
Hubbell, Inc.
Huber and Suhner AG
Kuhlman Corp.
Leader Universal Holdings Bhd
NKT Holding a/S
Pacific Dunlop Ltd.
Pacific Electric Wire and Cable Co. Ltd.
Phelps Dodge Corp.
Pirelli SpA
PT Kabelindo Murni
PT Sucaro
PT Voksel Electric
Southwire Co.
Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd.