Thermal and Digestion Waste-to-Energy Technologies Worldwide

Mar 1, 2011
224 Pages - Pub ID: SB2847741
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Each year the world generates more than 2.1 billion tons of waste, disposes of most of that waste it in landfills, and allows it to decay and release methane (a powerful greenhouse gas that drives climate change), carbon dioxide, volatile organic compounds, odors, groundwater quality pollutants, and a host of other air, water, and soil pollutants. Locked inside of the 2.1 billion tons of waste is approximately 24.5 quadrillion Btu of energy - enough heat to generate about 10% of the electricity consumed annually around the globe. Meanwhile, in many developed nations, the availability of landfill capacity has been flat or steadily decreasing due to regulatory, siting, and environmental permitting constraints on new landfills and landfill expansions. As a result, new approaches to waste management are rapidly being written into public and institutional policies at local to national levels.

Landfilling, which is still employed at the overwhelming majority of global waste management facilities in developed nations, generally performs well in terms of throughput, public health, and safety. But many current and widespread waste management practices are mediocre or even poor performers in terms of energy efficiency and environmental performance. For instance, the conventional municipal solid waste chain is commonly characterized by moderate to long haul distances, which generate substantial greenhouse gas emissions, followed by long-term storage in a landfill, releasing methane and other pollutants. In developing nations, landfills can pose major public health concerns, and can in some cases represent a significant fire hazard due to spontaneous ignition. Many liquid waste streams, especially in the livestock and food production industries, are only minimally treated prior to discharge. Dairy wastes, for instance, can result in excessive nutrient loading of farm fields, while municipal wastewater, especially in developing nations, may contain high levels of biochemical oxygen demand, bacteria, and other harmful pollutants.

Waste to energy technologies - incineration, gasification, plasma gasification, pyrolysis, and anaerobic digestion - provide a convenient solution to many of these waste management issues. For instance, installation of a waste to energy conversion facility near a large urban center can reduce the number of truck, train, or barge trips to landfills, reduce the volume of new material that is being stored in landfills, and reduce the proportion of organic matter that is stored in a landfill, which in turn reduces the production rates of landfill methane. Liquid waste to energy technologies can also reduce the concentration of water quality constituents in treated effluent, by substantially reducing bacterial loading, biochemical oxygen demand, and other constituents.

Bolstered by global concern and policy actions relating to climate change, waste to energy technologies also support low-carbon and in some cases carbon-neutral energy production. As a result, the global market for waste to energy technologies has evidenced substantial growth over the last five years, increasing from $4.83 billion in 2006, to 7.08 billion in 2010 with continued market growth through the global economic downturn. Over the coming decade, growth trends are expected to continue, led by expansion in the US, European, Chinese, and Indian markets. By 2021, based on continued growth in Asian markets combined with the maturation of European waste management regulations and European and US climate mitigation strategies, the annual global market for waste to energy technologies will exceed $27 billion, for all technologies combined.

The market expansion projected for waste to energy technologies maintains roots in the waste industry as well as the alternative fuels/power industry. Demand for waste management solutions and for alternative energy sources thereby coalesce to drive demand for waste to energy technologies. A significant advantage of these dual drivers is that demand for waste to energy technologies is resilient. For example, even in the unlikely event that demand for alternative energy slackens over the coming decade, the demand for waste management solutions would remain, and would continue to drive the installation of new waste to energy facilities.

Thermal and Digestion Waste-to-Energy Technologies Worldwide contains comprehensive data on the worldwide market for waste to energy technologies (incineration, gasification, pyrolysis and thermal depolymerization, and anaerobic digestion), including historic (2006-2010) and forecast (2011-2021) market size data in terms of the dollar value of product shipments, with breakdowns at the national level for major markets. The report identifies key trends affecting the marketplace, along with trends driving growth, and central challenges to further market development. The report also provides company profiles for waste to energy leaders in municipal solid waste and other waste management industries.

Report Methodology

The information in Thermal and Digestion Waste-to-Energy Technologies Worldwide is based on data from International Energy Agency, the US Energy Information Agency, the Waste to Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT), the European Commission, the National Bureau of Statistics of China, India’s Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation, the U.S. Department of Commerce, U.S. national laboratories, U.S. and global energy research institutions, along with information from other trade associations, business journals, company literature and websites, Securities and Exchange Commission reportings, and research services such as Simmons Market Research Bureau.

What You’ll Get in This Report

Thermal and Digestion Waste-to-Energy Technologies Worldwide makes important predictions and recommendations regarding the near term future of the global waste to energy market, with breakdowns for each of the five technologies considered in this report, with additional market breakdowns for major national markets. It pinpoints methods that current and prospective industry players can capitalize on existing trends, spearhead new trends, and identify and expand into niche and specialty markets. No other market research report provides both comprehensive analysis and extensive, quality data that Thermal and Digestion Waste-to-Energy Technologies Worldwide offers. Plus, you’ll benefit from extensive data, presented in easy-to-read and practical charts, tables and graphs.

How You’ll Benefit from This Report

If your company is already doing business in the waste to energy market, in associated manufacturing industries, or is considering making the leap, you will find this report invaluable, as it provides a comprehensive package of information and insight not offered in any other single source. Waste to energy technology holders and developers, investors, marketers, midstream industry, and waste to energy startups will also benefit from key insights into market structure, the supply chain, projects worldwide, and industry suppliers associated with waste to energy technologies. The report provides an extensive review of markets for waste to energy, including appurtenances, from 2006 as well as projects and trends through 2021.

This report will also help:

  • Marketing managers identify market opportunities and develop targeted promotion plans for waste to energy technologies, components, materials, and services.
  • Research and development professionals stay on top of competitor initiatives and explore demand for waste to energy technologies, components, materials, and associated services.
  • Business development executives and entrepreneurs understand the dynamics of the industry/market and identify possible partnerships.
  • Advertising agencies working with clients in the waste to energy industry to understand the market for waste to energy technologies, their application, and the product procurement and project construction process; to develop messages and images that compel consumers to invest in companies supplying or operating waste to energy facilities.
  • Information and research center librarians provide market researchers, brand and product managers and other colleagues with the vital information they need to do their jobs more effectively.
Chapter 1: Executive Summary
Scope
Global Waste and Management and Role of Waste to Energy
Figure 1-1: Annual Per Capita Municipal Waste Generated for OECD Countries (Metric Tonnes)
Waste to Energy Feedstocks and Technologies
Applications, Benefits, and Drawbacks of Waste to Energy Technologies
Waste to Energy Market Valuations
Incineration
Figure 1-2: Global Market for Incinerators and Incinerator Plant Ancillaries: 2006 - 2010 Historic and 2011-2021 Projected ($ Millions)
Gasification
Figure 1-3: Global Market for Gasifiers and Gasifier Plant Ancillaries: 2006 - 2010 Historic and 2011-2021 Projected ($ Millions)
Plasma Gasification
Figure 1-4: Global Market for Plasma Gasifiers and Plant Ancillaries: 2006 - 2010 Historic and 2011-2021 Projected ($ Millions)
Pyrolysis
Figure 1-5: Global Market for Pyrolysis and Pyrolysis Plant Ancillaries: 2006 - 2010 Historic and 2011-2021 Projected ($ Millions)
Anaerobic Digestion
Figure 1-6: Global Market for Anaerobic Digesters and Anaerobic Digester Ancillaries: 2006 - 2010 Historic and 2011-2021 Projected ($ Millions)
Global Waste to Energy Market Summary
Figure 1-7: Global Market for WtE Technologies; Historic (2006-2010) and Projected (2011-2021) ($ Billions)
Waste to Energy Product Pricing
Incineration
Figure 1-8: Incinerator Costs (USD)
Gasification
Figure 1-9: Gasification Costs (USD)
Plasma Gasification
Figure 1-10: Plasma Gasifier Costs (USD)
Pyrolysis
Figure 1-11: Pyrolysis Costs (USD)
Anaerobic Digestion
Figure 1-12: Anaerobic Digestion Costs, Animal Wastes/Wastewater (USD)
Figure 1-13: Anaerobic Digestion Costs, MSW (USD)
Industry Trends and WtE Financing
WtE Facilities Supply Chain
Figure 1-14: WtE Technologies, Facility Supply Chain
Figure 1-15: Municipal Solid Waste Supply Chain
Figure 1-16: Generalized Non-MSW Waste Feedstock Supply Chain
Waste to Energy Product Promotion
Job Creation
Incineration
Figure 1-17: Projected Construction and Operation Period Job Creation Rates for Incineration; 2011 to 2021 (Annual Jobs Created)
Gasification
Figure 1-18: Projected Construction and Operation Period Job Creation Rates for Gasification; 2011 to 2021 (Annual Jobs Created)
Plasma Gasification
Figure 1-19: Projected Construction and Operation Period Job Creation Rates for Plasma Gasification; 2011 to 2021 (Annual Jobs Created)
Pyrolysis
Figure 1-20: Projected Construction and Operation Period Job Creation Rates for Pyrolysis; 2011 to 2021 (Annual Jobs Created)
Anaerobic Digestion
Figure 1-21: Projected Construction and Operation Period Job Creation Rates for Anaerobic Digestion; 2011 to 2021 (Annual Jobs Created)
Waste to Energy End Users
Table 1-1: Thermal Technology End Users
Table 1-2: Anaerobic Digester End Users
Summary
Figure 1-22: Global Market for WtE Technologies; Historic (2006-2010) and Projected (2011-2021) ($ Billions)


Chapter 2: Overview of Waste to Energy Technologies
Scope
Global Waste and Management
Figure 2-1: Annual Per Capita Municipal Waste Generated for OECD Countries (Metric Tonnes)
Role of Waste to Energy
Waste to Energy Feedstocks
Dairy Waste and Other Animal Husbandry Wastes
Table 2-1: Waste to Energy Feedstock Categories
Food Processing Wastes
Greenwaste
Hospital Waste/Biohazard
Industrial Wastes
Sanitary Waste
Municipal Solid Waste
Waste to Energy Systems
Table 2-2 Waste to Energy Technologies and Feedstocks
Table 2-3 Energy Products from Waste to Energy Technologies
Incineration
Figure 2-2: Incinerator Schematic
Gasification
Figure 2-3: Gasification Schematic
Plasma Gasification
Figure 2-4: Plasma Gasification Schematic
Pyrolysis
Figure 2-5: Pyrolysis Example Schematic
Anaerobic Digestion
Figure 2-6: Schematic of Digestion of Manure Combined with Greenwaste
Applications and Benefits of Waste to Energy Technologies
Waste Management: Mass/Volume Reduction and Avoidance of Landfilling
Power Generation
Methane Production
Liquid Fuels Production
Heat Production
Pollutant Emissions Reduction
Greenhouse Gas Emissions Management
Destruction of Harmful Microbes and Biological Agents
Land Area Requirements
Mechanical Biological Treatment
Drawbacks of Waste to Energy Technologies
Environmental Concerns
Potential Competition with Recycling
Potential Competition with Composting
Increased Pollution under Some Systems
Public Opinion
Cost/Benefit
Summary


Chapter 3: Waste to Energy Technologies - Market Size and Growth
Scope
Market Assessment Methodology
Project-Based Market Evaluations
Additional Market Valuation Factors
Demand for Municipal Waste Stream Management and Waste Reduction
Figure 3-1: Historic and Projected Annual Municipal Solid Waste Generation, Global and US (Billion Tons per Year)
Reuse, Recycling, Composting, and Waste to Energy
Growth of Biomass, Food Waste, and Animal Husbandry Waste to Energy
Environmental and Social Concerns of Waste Management
Alternative Energy Growth and Demand
Waste to Energy Projects
Table 3-1: Anticipated Global WtE Projects
Factors Affecting Market Size and Growth
Feedstock Availability: landfilling reduction targets, waste stream diversion requirements, and other key waste management trends that inform feedstock availability;
Table 3-2: European Union Mandated Waste Reduction Targets
Table 3-3: Great Britain National Waste Reduction Targets
Table 3-4: New Zealand’s Adopted Waste Management Strategy
Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction requirements, targets, and strategies;
Demand for Alternative and Renewable Energy
Figure 3-2: Global Energy Consumption, Historic (2007) and Projected (Through 2035) (Quadrillion British Thermal Units per Year)
Figure 3-3: Global Historic Energy Production and Projected Increases in Renewable and Other Power Sources, 1990-2035 (Quadrillion British Thermal Units per Year)
Costs and WtE Project Economics
Public acceptance of WtE
Other Relevant Trends
WtE Technologies Markets
Global Market for Incineration
Figure 3-4: Global Market for Incinerators and Incinerator Plant Ancillaries: 2006 - 2010 Historic and 2011-2021 Projected ($ Millions)
Table 3-5: Global Market for Incinerators and Incinerator Plant Ancillaries: 2006-2010 Historic and 2011-2021 Projected ($ Millions)
Figure 3-5: Regional WtE Markets for Incineration: 2006 (Historic), 2011 (Projected), and 2021 (Projected) ($ Millions)
Table 3-6: Incinerator Market Data and Projections, Major Countries: 2006 (Historic), 2011 (Projected), and 2021 (Projected) ($ Millions)
Table 3-7: Annual Historic and Projected Global Increases in Incinerator Waste Capacity (Daily Tons) and Power Generation Capacity (MW)
Global Market for Gasification
Figure 3-6: Global Market for Gasifiers and Gasifier Plant Ancillaries: 2006 - 2010 Historic and 2011-2021 Projected ($ Millions)
Table 3-8: Global Market for Gasifiers and Gasifier Plant Ancillaries: 2006-2010 Historic and 2011-2021 Projected ($ Millions)
Figure 3-7: Regional WtE Markets for Gasification: 2006 (Historic), 2011 (Projected), and 2021 (Projected) ($ Millions)
Table 3-9: Gasification Market Data and Projections, Major Countries: 2006 (Historic), 2011 (Projected), and 2021 (Projected) ($ Millions)
Table 3-10: Annual Historic and Projected Global Increases in Gasifier Waste Capacity (Daily Tons) and Power Generation Capacity (MW)
Global Market for Plasma Gasification
Figure 3-8: Global Market for Plasma Gasifiers and Plant Ancillaries: 2006 - 2010 Historic and 2011-2021 Projected ($ Millions)
Table 3-11: Global Market for Plasma Gasifiers and Plant Ancillaries: 2006-2010 Historic and 2011-2021 Projected ($ Millions)
Figure 3-9: Regional WtE Markets for Plasma Gasification: 2006 (Historic), 2011 (Projected), and 2021 (Projected) ($ Millions)
Table 3-12: Plasma Gasification Market Data and Projections, Major Countries: 2006 (Historic), 2011 (Projected), and 2021 (Projected) ($ Millions)
Table 3-13: Annual Historic and Projected Global Increases in Plasma Gasifier Waste Capacity (Daily Tons) and Power Generation Capacity (MW)
Global Market for Pyrolysis
Figure 3-10: Global Market for Pyrolysis and Pyrolysis Plant Ancillaries: 2006 - 2010 Historic and 2011-2021 Projected ($ Millions)
Table 3-14: Global Market for Pyrolysis and Pyrolysis Plant Ancillaries: 2006-2010 Historic and 2011-2021 Projected ($ Millions)
Figure 3-11: Regional WtE Markets for Pyrolysis: 2006 (Historic), 2011 (Projected), and 2021 (Projected) ($ Millions)
Table 3-15: Pyrolysis Market Data and Projections, Major Countries: 2006 (Historic), 2011 (Projected), and 2021 (Projected) ($ Millions)
Table 3-16: Annual Historic and Projected Global Increases in Pyrolysis Waste Capacity (Daily Tons) and Power Generation Capacity (MW)
Global Market for Anaerobic Digestion
Figure 3-12: Global Market for Anaerobic Digesters and Anaerobic Digester Ancillaries: 2006 - 2010 Historic and 2011-2021 Projected ($ Millions)
Table 3-17: Global Market for Anaerobic Digesters and Anaerobic Digesters Plant Ancillaries: 2006-2010 Historic and 2011-2021
Projected ($ Millions)
Figure 3-13: Regional WtE Markets for Anaerobic Digesters: 2006 (Historic), 2011 (Projected), and 2021 (Projected) ($ Millions)
Table 3-18: Anaerobic Digester Market Data and Projections, Major Countries: 2006 (Historic), 2011 (Projected), and 2021 (Projected) ($ Millions)
Table 3-19: Annual Historic and Projected Global Increases in Anaerobic Digesters Waste Capacity (Daily Tons) and Power Generation Capacity (MW)
Summary
Figure 3-14: Global Market for WtE Technologies; Historic (2006-2010) and Projected (2011-2021) ($ Billions)
Figure 3-15: Percentage of Global Market Shares for WtE Technologies; Historic (2006-2010) and Projected (2011-2021)


Chapter 4: Waste to Energy Technologies - Market and Product Trends
Scope
WtE Product Pricing
Global Economic Factors Influencing WtE Project Costs
Regional and Cost Considerations
Figure 4-1: Worker Labor Compensation Rates, 1998-2008 (US$)
Technology Specific Costs and Cost Factors
Incinerators
Figure 4-2: Incinerator Costs (USD)
Table 4-1: Incineration Cost Profiles
Gasification
Figure 4-3: Gasification Costs (USD)
Table 4-2: Gasification Cost Profiles
Plasma Gasification
Figure 4-4: Plasma Gasifier Costs (USD)
Table 4-3: Plasma Gasification, Typical Cost Profiles
Pyrolysis
Figure 4-5: Pyrolysis Costs (USD)
Table 4-4: Pyrolysis, Typical Cost Profiles
Anaerobic Digestion/Fermentation/MBT
Figure 4-6: United States Anaerobic Digester Facilities: Animal Husbandry Wastes
Figure 4-7: US On-Farm Anaerobic Digester Costs
Table 4-5: Anaerobic Digestion, Typical Cost Profiles, Animal Wastes and Wastewater Treatment
Figure 4-8: Anaerobic Digestion Costs, Animal Wastes and Wastewater Treatment (USD)
Table 4-6: Anaerobic Digestion, Typical Cost Profiles, MSW
Figure 4-9: Anaerobic Digestion Costs, MSW (USD)
Industry Trends
Importance of Feedstock Availability
New Product Developments and Product Trends
Public Relations, Environmental, and Permitting Concerns
Figure 4-10 Waste Management Hierarchy for WtE Projetcs
Waste to Energy Ownership
Public Ownership
Private Ownership
Project Development and Financing Trends
Table 4-7: Common WtE Project Finance Mechanisms
Venture Capital and Equities
Grant Funding, Government Loans, and Other Government Incentives
Public/Government Funding
Project Revenues and Cash on Hand
Private Debt Financing
Mixed Funding Sources
Summary


Chapter 5: Waste to Energy Technologies - Supply Chain and Promotion
Scope
WtE Facilities Supply Chain
Figure 5-1: WtE Technologies, Facility Supply Chain
Waste Feedstock Supply Chains
Figure 5-2: Municipal Solid Waste Supply Chain
Figure 5-3: Generalized Non-MSW Waste Feedstock Supply Chain
Waste to Energy Product Promotion
Promotion to the End User
Promotion to Government and the Public
Summary


Chapter 6: Waste to Energy Technologies - Job Creation Estimates
Scope
Modes of Job Creation
Job Creation Projections and Methods
Incineration
Figure 6-1: Projected Construction and Operation Period Job Creation Rates for Incineration; 2011 to 2021 (Annual Jobs Created)
Figure 6-2: Total Cumulative Construction and Operation Period Job Creation Rates for Incineration; 2011 to 2021 (Cumulative Total Number of Jobs Created)
Gasification
Figure 6-3: Projected Construction and Operation Period Job Creation Rates for Gasification; 2011 to 2021 (Annual Jobs Created)
Figure 6-4: Total Cumulative Construction and Operation Period Job Creation Rates for Gasification; 2011 to 2021 (Cumulative Total Number of Jobs Created)
Plasma Gasification
Figure 6-5: Projected Construction and Operation Period Job Creation Rates for Plasma Gasification; 2011 to 2021 (Annual Jobs Created)
Figure 6-6: Total Cumulative Construction and Operation Period Job Creation Rates for Plasma Gasification; 2011 to 2021 (Cumulative Total Number of Jobs Created)
Pyrolysis
Figure 6-7: Projected Construction and Operation Period Job Creation Rates for Pyrolysis; 2011 to 2021 (Annual Jobs Created)
Figure 6-8: Total Cumulative Construction and Operation Period Job Creation Rates for Pyrolysis; 2011 to 2021 (Cumulative Total Number of Jobs Created)
Anaerobic Digestion
Figure 6-9: Projected Construction and Operation Period Job Creation Rates for Anaerobic Digestion; 2011 to 2021 (Annual Jobs Created)
Figure 6-10: Total Cumulative Construction and Operation Period Job Creation Rates for Anaerobic Digestion; 2011 to 2021 (Cumulative Total Number of Jobs Created)
Summary
Figure 6-11: Total Cumulative Construction and Operation Period Job Creation for all WtE Technologies; 2011 - 2021 (Cumulative Total Number of Jobs Created, Thousands)


Chapter 7: Competitive Profiles
Scope
Methodology and Selection of Profiles
Alpha Bio Systems, Inc.
Overview
Performance
Product Portfolio
Company News and Developments
The Babcock & Wilcox Company
Overview
Performance
Figure 7-1: Babcock and Wilcox Revenues, 2007-2010e
Product Portfolio
Company News and Developments
BlueFire Renewables Inc
Overview
Performance
Figure 7-2: BlueFire Renewables, Inc., Revenues, 2007-2010e
Product Portfolio
Company News and Developments
Covanta Energy Corporation
Overview
Performance
Figure 7-3: Covanta Energy Corporation, Revenues, 2006-2010e
Product Portfolio
Company News and Developments
Ener-G PLC
Overview
Performance
Product Portfolio
Company News and Developments
Fisia Babcock Environment GmbH
Overview
Performance
Figure 7-4: Fisia Babcock Environment, GmbH, Revenues, 2006-2010e
Product Portfolio
Company News and Developments
Florida Syngas LLC
Overview
Performance
Product Portfolio
Company News and Developments
Frontline BioEnergy, LLC
Overview
Performance
Product Portfolio
Company News and Developments
Gershman, Brickner & Bratton, Inc. (GBB)
Overview
Performance
Product Portfolio
Company News and Developments
Martin GmbH
Overview
Performance
Product Portfolio
Company News and Developments
Pyrogenesis Canada, Inc
Overview
Performance
Product Portfolio
Company News and Developments
QinetiQ
Overview
Performance
Figure 7-5: QinetiQ, Revenues, 2006-2010e
Product Portfolio
Company News and Developments
Siemens AG
Overview
Performance
Figure 7-6: Siemens AG, Revenues, 2007-2010e
Product Portfolio
Company News and Developments
Takuma Co., Ltd.
Overview
Performance
Figure 7-7: Takuma Co., Ltd., Revenues, 2006-2010e
Product Portfolio
Company News and Developments
UTS-Residual Processing LLC
Overview
Performance
Product Portfolio
Company News and Developments
Veolia Environnement S.A.
Overview
Performance
Figure 7-8: Veolia Environnement S.A., Revenues, 2006-2010e
Product Portfolio
Company News and Developments
Wheelabrator Technologies Inc
Overview
Performance
Figure 7-9: Wheelabrator Technologies, Inc., Revenues, 2006-2010e
Product Portfolio
Company News and Developments


Chapter 8: End Users
Scope
Waste to Energy End Users: Thermal Technologies
Table 8-1: Thermal Technology End Users
Incineration
Gasification and Plasma Gasification
Pyrolysis and Depolymerization
Waste to Energy End Users: Anaerobic Digesters
Table 8-2: Anaerobic Digester End Users
Dairies and Animal Husbandry
Food and Meat Processing Industries
Municipal Greenwaste and Municipal Solid Waste
Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants
Table 8-3 WWTP Anaerobic Digester Typical Production Rate and Cost Parameters
Summary

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